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Marianne Clark Sharp autobiography and scrapbook, 1907-1978

 Series — Multiple Containers
Identifier: MSS 6204 Series 1

Scope and Contents

Autobiography of Sharp's early life, covering the period from 1907 to 1940. Written in journal volumes, the account is supplemented by inserted letters, photographs, ephemera, and other items documenting the events described. Prepared in the late 1970s. Dated circa 1907-1978.

Dates

  • 1907-1978

Creator

Conditions Governing Access

Open for public research.

Conditions Governing Use

It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain any necessary copyright clearances. Permission to publish material from the Marianne Clark Sharp papers must be obtained from the Supervisor of Reference Services and/or the L. Tom Perry Special Collections Coordinating Committee.

Biographical History

From the Collection:

Marianne Clark Sharp (1901-1990) was in the Relief Society General Board in 1940 and eventually became the first counselor of the Relief Society General Presidency.

Marianne Clark Sharp was born October 28, 1901 to Luacine Annette Savage and Joshua Reuben Clark, Jr. in Salt Lake City, Utah. She spent her school days in Washington D. C. and then moved back to Utah with her family to attend the University of Utah, where she graduated in ancient languages in 1924. She taught Latin her senior year at the University and Stewart Training School and continued teaching after graduation. She married Ivor Sharp on June 15, 1927 in Salt Lake City, Utah. They lived in New York City for eleven years while he worked at the American Telephone and Telegraph Company.

Sharp was very active in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She was appointed to the Relief Society General Board in 1940. In 1943 she became the associate editor of Relief Society Magazine and continued to serve in this position until the demise of the magazine in 1971. She was called to be the first counselor in the Relief Society General Presidency of the Church in 1945. She received an honorary doctoral degree of humanities from Brigham Young University in 1974. She also served as a delegate to the 75th anniversary conference of the International Council of Women, which was held in Montreal and Washington D.C. She died January 2, 1990 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Extent

3 boxes

Language of Materials

English