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United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs

 Organization

Dates

  • Existence: 1824-

Administrative History

The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), established in 1824, facilitates relationships between the United States and federally-recognized tribes.

It is the oldest agency of the United States Department of the Interior with roots that reach back to the Continental Congress. After its creation, the BIA assisted in negotiating treaty agreements between the United States and various tribes in the late 18th and 19th centuries. The BIA also assists in the implementation of Federal laws. The BIA provides services directly or through contracts, grants, or compacts to American Indians and Alaska Natives. The BIA also manages the care and administration of millions of acres of land held in trust by the United States for American Indians, Indian tribes, and Alaska Natives. The Bureau of Indian Affairs mission is to: "enhance the quality of life, to promote economic opportunity, and to carry out the responsibility to protect and improve the trust assets of American Indians, Indian tribes, and Alaska Natives."

Citation

bia.gov, via WWW, Feb. 4, 2019 (est. 1824; facilitates relationships between U.S. and federally-recognized tribes; oldest agency of the U.S. Department of the Interior; roots reach back to Continental Congress; assisted in negotiating treaty agreements between the U.S. and various tribes in the late 18th and 19th centuries; assists in implementation of federal laws; provides services directly, through contracts, grants, or compacts to American Indians and Alaska Natives; manages care and administration of millions of acres of land held in trust by U.S. for American Indians, Indian tribes, Alaska Natives; BIA mission is to: "enhance the quality of life, to promote economic opportunity, and to carry out the responsibility to protect and improve the trust assets of American Indians, Indian tribes, and Alaska Natives.")

Found in 1 Collection or Record:

George D. Sherman letters

 File — Box: 1
Identifier: MSS 1938
Scope and Contents Letter press copies of handwritten and signed letters. The materials are addressed to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs in Washington, DC. Sherman writes about the condition of Ute Indians on the reservation, the nature of the supplies for them, and the functions of the Indian agency.
Dates: 1880-1881