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Reports

 Subject
Subject Source: Art & Architecture Thesaurus

Found in 5555 Collections and/or Records:

A blessing not wanted / Sharon Williams, 1968 January

 Item
Identifier: FA 2 Series 3 Sub-Series 5 Item 1.3.5.2.1
Scope and Contents note Report by Sharon Williams, who collected information from G. Dean Williams. Story recounts how Dean's cousin is very ill, is blessed that she will live, and sees visions of dead relatives in a beautiful setting, by which she is convinced that she wants to pass on. She cannot do so until the blessing is rescinded by the uncle who gave it.

A dream song / Geraldine Avant, 1967 December

 Item
Identifier: FA 2 Series 6 Item 1.6.10.1
Scope and Contents note Report by Geraldine Avant, who collected information from Jeffery O. Johnson. Story recounts how a woman has a dream prefiguring a meeting in which John Taylor speaks. When it takes place, she is able to sing the opening song from the memory of her dream, and sing the closing song in tongues. This leads to immediate conversion, baptism, and more speaking in tongues after confirmation.

A fall / Lynette Buchman, 1971 May

 Item
Identifier: FA 3 Series 2 Sub-Series 2 Sub-Series 5 Item 2.2.2.5.1.2.1
Scope and Contents note Report by Lynette Buchman, who collected information from Laurie Buchman. A man goes climbing up a canyon with two younger boys. One of the boys loses his footing, and the man falls from the cliff in an effort to steady him. On certain nights his scream can still be heard through the canyon.

A flower's disappearance / Kerrie Nebeker, 1978 October

 Item
Identifier: FA 3 Series 2 Sub-Series 2 Sub-Series 1 Item 2.2.2.1.33.1
Scope and Contents note Report by Utah State University folklore student Kerrie Nebeker, who collected information from Joi Randall. Two boys dare another to go into an Indian burial ground and take a flower from one of the graves. They all drive home in the same car afterwards, and leave the flower in the car with the doors locked. The next morning, the flower is gone.