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Smith, Joseph, Jr., 1805-1844

 Person

Dates

  • Existence: 1805-1844

Biographical History

Joseph Smith, Jr. (1805-1844) was a Mormon prophet and founder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Joseph Smith, Jr. was born on December 23, 1805, to parents Joseph Sr. and Lucy Mack Smith. He was the fifth of eleven children. He worked on the family farm in Vermont and later in western New York. A series of remarkable spiritual experiences prepared him for his prophetic calling. Beginning in 1820 at Palmyra, New York, Joseph Smith saw God the Father and Jesus Christ in vision. Through revelation, he translated and published the Book of Mormon, organized The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on April 6, 1830, and received revelations to guide the Church. By inspiration, he called Apostles and other Church leaders, defined doctrines, and taught the principles and ordinances that would lead to exaltation. Under his leadership, Latter-day Saints founded communities in Ohio, Missouri, and Illinois. He was sustained as First Elder of the Church on April 6, 1830. On June 27, 1844, at Carthage, Illinois, Joseph Smith died a martyr to his faith.

Citation

Book of Mormon. Japanese. Morumon-kyō, 1909 (1950 printing): t.p. (Josefu Sumisu [in Japanese])

Book of Moemon. Armenian. Girkʻ Mōrmōni, 1937: t.p. (Kart. Chōzēf Smitʻh)

Britannica.com, Oct. 13, 2010 (Joseph Smith, originally Joseph Smith, Jr. (b. Dec. 23, 1805, Sharon, Vt., U.S.; d. June 27, 1844, Carthage, Ill.), Mormon prophet and founder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints)

The Book of Mormon, 1830: title page (Joseph Smith, Junior)

Doctrine and covenants of the Church of the Latter Day Saints, 1835: title page (Joseph Smith, Junior)

Encyclopedia of Mormonism, page 1331 (Joseph Smith, Jr. (1805-1844), the Prophet Joseph Smith, founding prophet of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; born December 23, 1805 in Sharon, Vermont; moved to Palmyra, N.Y. in 1816; founded the Church in Fayette, N.Y. April 6, 1830; migrated with the Church to Kirtland, Ohio in 1831; then to Far West, Missouri in 1838; finally to Nauvoo, Ill. (which he founded) in 1839; killed by a mob in Carthage, Ill. June 27, 1844)

Found in 265 Collections and/or Records:

Elders at the first conference at Nauvoo since the expulsion of 1846 : photographed in front of the the Joseph Smith Mansion

 File — Folder: 1
Identifier: MSS 2191
Scope and Contents An oversize photograph, a newspaper clipping entitled: "Mormons Visit Nauvoo". A brief biography of Gilbert Morse Burr (1881-1982), one of the missionaries in the photograph, is enclosed. It was written by his daughter, Ardys Burr Crane.

Robert Filmore letter

 File — Folder: 1
Identifier: MSS 1339
Scope and Contents Photocopy of a handwritten and signed letter, dated 6 July 1844, and composed in Warren County, Illinois. Filmore writes to "dear children" and tells them about the murder of the first president of the Mormon Church, Joseph Smith, and his brother Hyrum. He also speaks about the Mormon temple in Nauvoo, Illinois.

Edward R. Ford letter

 File — Folder: 1
Identifier: MSS SC 2703
Scope and Contents Photocopy of a handwritten and signed letter dated 8 Sept. 1842, composed in St. Louis, Missouri, and addressed to "His Exelency," probably governor Thomas Reynolds of Missouri. Ford describes an attempt to arrest the first president of the Mormon Church, Joseph Smith, and his friend, Orrin Porter Rockwell.

Biography of Charles Ambrose Foster

 File — Folder: 1
Identifier: MSS 813
Scope and Contents Typewritten research paper for a Religion 242 class at Brigham Young University taught by "Bro. Porter." Cosman writes about the role played by Charles A. Foster and his brother, Robert Foster, in the murder of the first president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Joseph Smith (1805-1844). Charles Foster later became mayor of Vicksburg, Mississippi, and was the director of two hospitals.

Rell G. Francis photograph collection

 Collection — Multiple Containers
Identifier: MSS 4255
Scope and Contents This collection contains 205 photographs from a variety of photographers with studios in Utah including Ad. Anderson, Daniels Photo, C.W. Carter, Conkling and Co., Fox & Symons, Huish, John Matson, Morris & Co., C.R. Savage, Sainsbury & Johnson, and Stringham & Stringham. There are also photographs from out-of-state and international photographers. Portraits include Joseph Smith, Brigham Young, and Orson Pratt.

Barzillai Frost travel journal

 Collection — Multiple Containers
Identifier: MSS 3276
Scope and Contents Journal kept by Barzillai Frost during his travels in the West in 1843. Includes an account of his visit to Nauvoo, Ill., and his meeting with Joseph Smith and other prominent Mormons. A photocopy and transcript of the diary are also included in the collection, as well as articles and biographical information on Frost.

Mary Field Garner autobiography

 File — Folder: 1
Identifier: MSS 1141
Scope and Contents Typewritten excerpts from an autobiography. Garner writes about her conversion to Mormonism, her life in Nauvoo, Illinois, her memories of Joseph Smith (1805-1844) and the "mantle" of the prophet falling on Brigham Young (1801-1877), her journey to Utah, and her life in Slaterville, Utah.

Geauga County (Ohio) court record

 File — Folder: 1
Identifier: MSS SC 1930
Scope and Contents One handwritten court record. The item is a copy made in 1860 by William N. Keeny, clerk of Geauga County, of the original court record dated 1839. The Halsted Haines Co. sued Joseph Smith (1805-1844), Hyrum Smith, Olivery Cowdery, Sidney Rigdon, Brigham Young, and other Mormon Church leaders for redress in connection with questionable business practices. Since the defendants failed to appear when summoned, the plaintiffs were awarded $2337.35 plus expenses.

George Cannon biography

 File — Folder: 1
Identifier: MSS SC 1753
Scope and Contents Photocopy of a typed biography of George Cannon, English convert to the Mormon Church, who emigrated to the United States and settled in Nauvoo. He made coffins for the Mormon prophet, Joseph Smith (1805-1844), and his brother, Hyrum, and plaster casts of their heads.