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Cooper, Merian C.

 Person

Dates

  • Existence: 1893-1973

Biographical History

Merian C. Cooper (1893-1973) was an aviator, air force officer, screenwriter, film director, and producer in the United States. He is best known for writing and directing King Kong.

Merian Caldwell Cooper was an American aviator, United States Air Force and Polish Air Force officer, adventurer, screenwriter, film director, and producer. He was a notable movie producer, and got his start with film traveling the world and working on documentaries, most famously Grass and Chang, together with Ernest B. Schoedsack. He was a member of the board of directors of Pan American Airways, but focused on film. During his film career, he worked for several Hollywood studios. He is considered co-inventor of the Cinerama film projection process. Cooper's most famous film was the 1933 movie King Kong. He was awarded an honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement in 1952 and received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1960.

Citation

Wikipedia, Nov. 16, 2010 (Merian C. Cooper; Merian Caldwell Cooper; b. Oct. 24, 1893 in Jacksonville, Fla.; d. Apr. 21, 1973 in San Diego, Calif.; director of King Kong). Mar. 21, 2017 (aviator, United States Air Force and Polish Air Force officer, adventurer, screenwriter, film director; notable movie producer; got his start with film traveling the world and working on documentaries Grass and Chang together with Ernest B. Schoedsack; member of the board of directors of Pan American Airways; co-inventor of Cinerama; most famous film King Kong (1933); honorary lifetime achievement Oscar in 1952, Hollywood Walk of Fame star in 1960.)

Kozlinski, Marcin, "Biography of Merian C. Cooper", International Movie Database, accessed March 21, 2012, http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0178260/bio

Found in 1 Collection or Record:

Merian C. Cooper writings, 1965

 Series
Identifier: MSS 2008 Series 10
Scope and Contents note Contains notes, drafts, published and unpublished literary manuscripts, and tearsheets from newspapers from 1921 to 1924, and 1965. It includes Cooper's proposal for an autobiographical project he titled Thirty Days.