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Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

 Organization

Dates

  • Existence: 1830-

Administrative History

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (1830-) is a restorationist Christian church founded by Joseph Smith in New York. It is commonly abbreviated as the LDS Church and colloquially referred to as the Mormon Church.

During the 1820s, the church's founder, Joseph Smith, experienced visions and was led to the golden plates from which the Book of Mormon was translated. The Church was officially founded by Joseph Smith on April 6, 1830, in Palmyra, New York. The members of the religion faced a series of persecutions, and eventually fled to Utah for refuge beginning in 1847.

The Church continued to grow and expand beyond Utah, and today it has a membership numbering over 15 million. It is headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah, with President M. Nelson serving as its prophet and president.

Citation

Encyclopedia of Mormonism, via WWW, Oct. 15, 2014 (History of the Church; founded April 6, 1830; LDS Church; Mormon Church; founder Joseph Smith; saw visions and found gold plates in the 1820s; persecution; fled to Utah in 1847; headquartered in Salt Lake)

Mormon Newsroom, via WWW, Oct. 15, 2014 (Statistical Report: April 2014 General Conference; membership over 15,000,000; prophet Thomas S. Monson)

Found in 26 Collections and/or Records:

Chester Alan Arthur pardon

 File — oversize-folder: 1
Identifier: MSS SC 2036
Scope and Contents Handwritten pardon issued by the office of the president of the United States, Chester A. Arthur (1829-1886) and signed by him. The item pardons John J. Kelly of Utah for crimes of "bigamy or polygamy and unlawful cohabitation."

Biography of William Rufus Rogers Stowell

 Collection — Folder: 1
Identifier: MSS 506
Abstract Includes typewritten and handwritten biographies of William Rufus Rogers Stowell. Also included are typed excerpts from the biography and photocopies of an account of Stowell's death handwritten by his grandson, Earl Stowell. William Stowell was a convert to the Mormon Church. He lived in Nauvoo, Illinois, migrated to Utah in 1852, served in the Utah Militia during the Utah Expedition, served on missions for the Mormon Church, and went to Mexico to avoid prosecution for polygamy.

Henry Green Boyle diaries

 Collection — Multiple Containers
Identifier: MSS 156
Scope and Contents Contains a handwritten autobiography and diaries related to Boyle's life and experience as a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The autobiography was written beginning in 1844 and, in the same volume, he starts a diary in 1846. Boyle kept 14 additional volumes of diaries, dating from 1855 to 1889. Most of the content relates to Boyle's missionary experiences in California and to Southern States Mission, including while he was mission president from 1875 to 1878. Also...

William Butler autobiographies and letters

 File — Folder: 1
Identifier: MSS SC 863
Scope and Contents This collection consists of autobiographies and personal letters. Included are four personal histories of varying lengths. Butler described his visions, business matters, family relationships, church assignments, missions served, and recounted many colorful experiences including hunting down and killing the murderer of one of his children. The letters were written by William Butler and his first wife, Emma Harvey, to their Henry Harvey Butler in 1891-2 while Henry was serving on a mission to...

Mina C. Cannon autograph books

 File — Folder: 1
Identifier: MSS 963
Scope and Contents Photocopies of handwritten autograph books. Mina received greetings and well wishes from many prominent Utahns and leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Many of these items were written from the Utah State penitentiary by Church leaders incarcerated for polygamy.

Udney Hay Jacob manuscript extracts

 File — Folder: 1
Identifier: MSS 478
Scope and Contents Typewritten copy of excerpts of a book published in Nauvoo, Illinois, in 1842. Jacob writes about the nature of marriage, fornication, and divorce. He states that women are the property of men and condones polygamy. The book was denounced by the first president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Joseph Smith, as "trash." The historian Faun Brodie suggests that Joseph Smith used the work to see the possible reaction to an announcement on polygamy. The item also includes an...

Luke William Gallup autobiography and diaries

 Collection — Box: 1
Identifier: MSS 2347
Scope and Contents Photocopy of a microfilm copy of a handwritten autobiography and diary. Gallup writes about his early life in Connecticut, his migration to Iowa, and how he joined the Mormon Church. Gallup moved to Springville, Utah, in 1851. He writes about his life in that town, his service during the Utah Expedition of 1857-8, his relationships to his wives, his mission for the Mormon Church to Connecticut. Gallup moved to Santa Ana, California, in 1888.

LDS Polygamy Oral History Project case files, 1976-1985

 Sub-Series
Identifier: MSS 7752 Series 1 Sub-Series 2
Scope and Contents Includes contracts, contact information, and biographical information for the participants, as well as the original audio recordings of the oral history interviews conducted by the LDS Polygamy Oral History Project, 1976-1985.

LDS Polygamy Oral History Project transcripts, 1959-1985

 Sub-Series
Identifier: MSS 7752 Series 1 Sub-Series 1
Scope and Contents Contains transcripts of recorded interviews done with participants in the LDS Polygamy Oral History Project, as well as background information about those participants, 1959-1985.

LDS Polygamy Oral History Project transcripts and case files, 1959-1985

 Series
Identifier: MSS 7752 Series 1
Scope and Contents Includes contracts from and contact information for participants in the LDS Polygamy Oral History Project, as well as the original audio recordings of the oral history interviews, and transcripts for those interviews, 1959-1985.